Wednesday, September 11, 2013

U.S. Coast Guard Helps Sea Turtle Survival

The Miami Herald reports:
A baby sea turtle moments before being released into the ocean off the coast of Boca Raton, Fla. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Mark Barney.
More than 500 sea turtle hatchlings were gently released by hand Thursday onto sea beds off Florida's Atlantic Coast, where the turtles have a better chance to survive.

The U.S. Coast Guard assisted with the release about six miles off the coast of Boca Raton because it is committed to protecting endangered species, officials said in a statement.

"I'm very passionate about the environment," said Chief Cannon Schider-Heisel with the U.S. Coast Guard. "And my job affords me the chance to do that sometimes, where I get to help educate the public about the environment. It's a facet of my job that I love."

Schider-Heisel, who volunteers at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, where the hatchlings were collected, joined marine scientist Melanie Stadler and other turtle rescue volunteers to release 311 loggerhead and 194 green sea turtles...

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/09/05/3607060/coast-guard-to-help-release-300.html#storylink=cpy
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf
One of the core missions of the U.S. Coast Guard is marine environmental protection. Whether educating the boating public about reducing speeds around manatees, enforcing protection zones for whales or working with partner agencies to remove derelict fishing nets from reefs, the Coast Guard ensures our nation’s waterways and their ecosystems remain healthy and sustainable.
But it wasn’t manatees, whales or reefs in the limelight last week – it was turtles; 505 turtles to be exact.
- See more at: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2013/09/500-baby-turtles-get-a-lift/#sthash.GRQsmoEu.710HHw0r.dpuf

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