Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Horses, Cowboys, & Kids Cowboy-Up In Compton



The Compton Cowboys, composed of 10 friends who have known one another since childhood, but officially came together as a group in 2017, are on a mission to combat negative stereotypes about African-Americans and the city of Compton through horseback riding.

The tight-knit group first met more than 20 years ago as members of the *Compton Jr. Posse, a nonprofit organization founded by Mayisha Akbar in Richland Farms, a semirural area in Compton that has been home to African-American horse riders since the mid-20th century. Like other nonprofits, the Compton Jr. Posse and the Compton Cowboys rely heavily on donations from alumni, government grants and local community support used to sustain the cost of the horses on the ranch.



...“The Compton Cowboys are a multigenerational story of black people’s ability to survive and create alternate worlds in the face of neglect,” said Thabisile Griffin, a doctoral candidate in history at the University of California, Los Angeles, who believes that many of the conditions that exist in Compton today, both inside and outside of the horse stables, have been a response to the lack of opportunities available to African-Americans. “Folks were frustrated, but subcultures of resistance persevered.”

--Today's post was excerpted from the New York Times. Read the entire story: 



* The Compton Jr. Posse (CJP) was developed to provide inner-city youth with year round after school alternatives to the lure of gang and drug lifestyles. For over 29 years, the Compton Jr. Posse has given inner city kids hope by teaming them with horses. Through these equestrian activities, our youth develop responsibility, discipline and self-esteem. Students learn to set and achieve both academic and career goals. There can be no better investment in their future.

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